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4 November, 2018

ALMOST FAMILY, Roy Hoffman

The complex friendship between a black housekeeper and her Jewish employer is at the heart of Hoffman’s prize-winning novel about life in the civil rights era South–now in a 35th Anniversary Edition!

Winner of the Lillian Smith Book Award and Alabama Library Association Award for fiction

Nebraska Waters is black. Vivian Gold is Jewish. In an Alabama kitchen where, for nearly thirty years, they share cups of coffee, fret over their children, and watch the civil rights movement unfold out their window, and into their homes, they are like family—almost.

As Nebraska makes her way, day in and out, to Vivian’s house to cook and help tend the Gold children, the “almost” threatens to widen into a great divide. The two women’s husbands affect their relationship, as do their children, Viv Waters and Benjamin Gold, born the same year and coming of age in a changing South. The bond between the women both strengthens and frays.

Roy Hoffman’s Almost Family (University of Alabama Press) explores the relationship that begins when one person goes to work for another, and their friendship—across lines of race, income, and religion—develops degrees of understanding yet growing misunderstanding. This edition (2018) commemorates the 35th anniversary of the book’s publication and features a foreword by the author and includes a discussion guide for readers and book clubs.

Review

PRAISE FOR THE FIRST EDITION
“Hoffman never lets facts flatten characters; he has made them too human—too strong or too stubborn—for that.”
New Yorker

“Everything in this book rings true—the dialogue, the cadences, the deft-touch observations, the best and worst of human nature.” —Atlanta Journal-Constitution

“Hoffman has got it all exactly right: the interlocking of individual lives and great public events that made every Southerner feel as though he or she were living on the very edge of history.”—Washington Post

Roy Hoffman is the author of the novels Come Landfall and Chicken Dreaming Corn and the nonfiction books Back Home: Journeys through Mobile and Alabama Afternoons: Profiles and Conversations. His essays have appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Washington Post, and he was a long-time staff writer for the Mobile Press-Register. He received the Clarence Cason Award in nonfiction from The University of Alabama and is on the faculty of Spalding University’s low-residency MFA in Writing Program.

1 November, 2018

BEYOND THE CALL, Eileen Rivers

A riveting account of three women who fought shoulder-to-shoulder with men and worked with local women to restore their lives and push back the Taliban

They marched under the heat with 40-pound rucksacks on their backs. They fired weapons out of the windows of military vehicles, defending their units in deadly battles. And they did things that their male counterparts could never do–gather intelligence on the Taliban from the women of Afghanistan. As females they could circumvent Muslim traditions and cultivate relationships with Afghan women who were bound by tradition not to speak with American military men. And their work in local villages helped empower Afghan women, providing them with the education and financial tools necessary to rebuild their nation–and the courage to push back against the insurgency that wanted to destroy it. For the women warriors of the military’s Female Engagement Teams (FET) it was dangerous, courageous, and sometimes heartbreaking work.

Beyond the Call (Da Capo/Hachette, November 2018) follows the groundbreaking journeys of three women as they first fight military brass and culture and then enemy fire and tradition. And like the men with whom they served, their battles were not over when they returned home.

A riveting story about three remarkable women soldiers and the incredible impact their service as a Female Engagement Team (FET) had on the war efforts in Afghanistan. They were able to win the trust of Afghan women and children, restoring faith in the future and improving quality of life…all this while still doing the heavy lifting required of a United States soldier in combat.”–General Ann Dunwoody (U.S. Army, Ret.), author of A Higher Standard

A compelling story, too long untold. Eileen Rivers reveals the power of women–of women in the U.S. military in Afghanistan, playing a crucial role in intelligence gathering that was impossible for their male counterparts. And the power of the Afghan women with whom they forged a bond. For the Afghan women, the war isn’t over, of course. And the American women faced battles of their own when they got home. If you start reading Eileen Rivers’s book, you won’t be able to stop. Some of it will make you angry. Much of it will make you proud.”–Susan Page, Washington Bureau Chief, USA TODAY

“Today, women are on the front lines of our nation’s wars all over the globe. Yet little has been written about them or the struggles they endure–both on and off the battlefield. Until now. Eileen Rivers’s account of three women who served in Afghanistan is both a gripping narrative and a sharp analysis of a historic cultural shift in our nation’s military. We owe it to the men and women who serve in our armed forces to understand this pressing issue. This book is a great place to start.”–Jim Michaels, author of A Chance in Hell: The Men Who Triumphed Over Iraq’s Deadliest City and Turned the Tide of War

“[The] story of the fight for women’s rights in a country where the male power structure opposes them…Compelling. The author’s own military experience gives the book a perspective that is especially useful. A solid, fact-filled look at an underreported piece of the American military.“―Kirkus Reviews

Eileen Rivers is a USA Today editor and editorial board member. Formerly with the Washington Post, she has been writing and reporting for more than fifteen years and has produced several multimedia online interactives covering the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. A veteran of the U.S. Army, she served in Kuwait following Desert Storm where she was sent into the former combat zone as an Arabic linguist, collecting and translating information from enemy targets. Rivers lives in Maryland.


31 October, 2018

FLAT, FLUID & FAST: Building Adaptable and Agile Workforces, Brynne S. Kennedy

Founder and CEO of global technology company Topia and thought leader Brynne S. Kennedy‘s  blueprint for leaders and managers to understand, navigate, and leverage the “talent mobility revolution” for maximum retention, efficiency, and sustainable value. (McGraw-Hill, September 2019, World exclusive of translation in Korea, Japan, Mainland China, Taiwan)

30 October, 2018

MAROONED: Jamestown, Shipwreck, and a New History of America’s Origin, Joseph Kelly, Ph.D.

“The U.S. loves its creation myths, and this mythmaking, myth-breaking history gives us a new character, Stephen Hopkins… Though Hopkins and those like him left few records, Kelly fleshes out the available glimpses with a vivid, detailed description of the settlement and its English and Native American contexts…Kelly’s dynamic narrative brings Jamestown to life and shows how history reflects the present as well as the past.” ―starred review, Booklist

For readers of Nathaniel Philbrick’s Mayflower, a groundbreaking history that makes the case for replacing Plymouth Rock with Jamestown as America’s founding myth. 

We all know the great American origin story. It begins with an exodus. Fleeing religious persecution, the hardworking, pious Pilgrims thrived in the wilds of New England, where they built their fabled city on a hill. Legend goes that the colony in Jamestown was a false start, offering a cautionary tale. Lazy louts hunted gold till they starved, and the shiftless settlers had to be rescued by English food and the hard discipline of martial law.

Neither story is true. In Marooned, Joseph Kelly reexamines the history of Jamestown and comes to a radically different and decidedly American interpretation of these first Virginians.

In this gripping account of shipwrecks and mutiny in America’s earliest settlements, Kelly argues that the colonists at Jamestown were literally and figuratively marooned, cut loose from civilization, and cast into the wilderness. The British caste system meant little on this frontier: those who wanted to survive had to learn to work and fight and intermingle with the nearby native populations. Ten years before the Mayflower Compact and decades before Hobbes and Locke, they invented the idea of government by the people. 150 years before Jefferson, they discovered the truth that all men were equal.

The epic origin of America was not an exodus and a fledgling theocracy. It is a tale of shipwrecked castaways of all classes marooned in the wilderness fending for themselves in any way they could–a story that illuminates who we are today.

“[A] stimulating history of Jamestown . . . a superb portrait of the founding, combining brilliant detail with epic sweep.” ―Starred review, Publishers Weekly

“An insightful re-examination of the 1607 Jamestown settlement . . . Kelly’s lively, heavily researched, frequently gruesome account gives a slight nod to Jamestown as the ‘better place to look for the genesis of American ideals.’” ―Starred review, Kirkus Reviews

“Joseph Kelley’s Marooned is a tale of intrigue, betrayal, and redemption from American’s colonial past. It is also a moving reimagining of the American story. Kelley’s history of Jamestown shows that America is a community born of marooned colonists, escaped slaves, and native inhabitants thrown together by an accident of history, and that the creed of liberty inscribed in the nation’s founding is not a foreign importation, but the unique inheritance of this potent brew.” ―William Egginton, author of THE SPLINTERING OF THE AMERICAN MIND

“Joseph Kelly’s Marooned re-tells the early American story with salutary attention to Native Americans, non-elite English settlers, and the dramas of shipwreck, maroonage, and self-determination. Familiar figures such as John Smith and Pocahontas get reinvented in the bloody story of Jamestown’s struggle against famine and incompetent leadership. Most excitingly, he offers new figures for the first English Americans, especially the rebellious commoner Stephen Hopkins, who lived, labored, and sometimes resisted authority in Bermuda, Jamestown, and eventually Plymouth Rock. Hopkins’s desire for liberty and struggle against aristocratic despotism make the marooned commoner a powerful figure for what was newly American about the early English experience of the New World.” ―Steve Mentz, author of SHIPWRECK MODERNITY: ECOLOGIES OF GLOBALIZATION 1550-1719


29 October, 2018

THE CONFESSIONS OF ADAM, David J. Marsh

In the tradition of The Dovekeepers, an imaginative retelling of one of our most important story–that of Creation–from Adam’s point-of-view. (Bold Vision, June 2019, World Rights)


26 October, 2018

Stuart

Why do we know so little about women’s lives through history?  That’s a question journalist and author Nancy Rubin Stuart has questioned for years – and why she’s devoted her books to chronicling women’s lives.  Today as women are again demanding a stronger voice personally, politically and professionally, she’s contemplated the lives of America’s Founding Fathers whose biographies were mostly written by men.

Nancy’s forthcoming book, Poor Richard’s Women: Benjamin Franklin in Love (Beacon Press, Fall 2020), consequently examines his life through the lens of his romantic attractions and reveals his personal struggle with passion and prudence.

Nancy, who serves as executive director of the Cape Cod Writers Center, is no stranger to the Revolutionary period.  Her recently published book, Defiant Brides depicted the wives of Benedict Arnold and General Henry Knox. That followed the award-winning The Muse of the Revolution on Mercy Otis Warren, the first female historian of the American Revolution.

Previous works included the acclaimed The Reluctant Spiritualist; American Empress, a Business Week and Newsday Best-Seller, and Isabella of Castile, a Book-of-the- Month Club Dividend. Those stories of women’s lives were inspired by Nancy’s earlier journalistic books, The Mother Mirror and The New Suburban Woman. Research on those works helped her understand why women’s lives were lost to time. As a young wife and mother, Nancy wrote frequently for the New York Times and national magazines.

Check out Nancy at www.nancyrubiinstuart.com

https://www.facebook.com/NancyRubinStuart/

www.writers@capecodwriterscenter.org


23 October, 2018

Marsh

David J. Marsh came to belief as a child and grew up steeped in biblical narratives. His father was a pastor and a student of both theology and  biblical languages. Growing up, Dave often asked him to read aloud the scriptures in their original Hebrew and Greek. While Dave could not understand them, the music of these languages in their original tongue fascinated him. His late father’s library of commentaries now lines a wall in his home.

In his debut novel, The Confessions of Adam (Bold Vision, Fall 2019, a re-telling of the universal and dramatic narrative that opens the book of Genesis, he has crafted a richly imagined story of creation and its aftermath – drawing on a lifetime of familiarity with the text as well as more recent study.

Mr. Marsh holds a BS in Communications from Grace College and an MFA in Creative Writing (Fiction) from Butler University, Indianapolis. A fascination with Hebrew biblical narratives drives much of his fiction. Dave’s work has been recognized by or appeared in Utmost, Booth Online, NoiseMedium, and Fixional. 

Dave is founder of the Westside Writers’ Workshop and twice monthly he records what he’s learning about the craft of fiction on his blog “Revel and Rant” at www.davidjmarsh.comDave and his wife Cyndi reside in Danville, Indiana.


20 October, 2018

THE DOG WENT OVER THE MOUNTAIN, Peter Zheutlin

From the bestselling author of RESCUE ROAD and RESCUED, comes a charming cross-country journey of two gents approaching late middle age–Peter Zheutlin and his beloved rescue dog, Albie. Inspired by John Steinbeck’s Travels with Charlie, the two find that despite our differences, America is a big-hearted country offering adventure, moments of humor and new-found wisdom. (Pegasus, September 2019, World Rights)


6 October, 2018

Muppets Meet the Classics: Fairy Tales from the Brothers Grimm, Erik Forrest Jackson

Some fairy tales are too silly. Others are too serious. But when the Muppets meet the classics? The stories are just right! Join Kermit the Frog, Miss Piggy, and the other Muppets as they bring favorite fairy tales to life in their own hilarious way.

Once upon a time, there was a pretty young chicken named Camillarella, who had very heavy shoes and an enchanting Chicken Dance. Or maybe you’d prefer to hear the story of Janice, the flower child with braided tresses as yellow as SpongeBob. With all the favorite characters–Kermit, Miss Piggy, and others–these fairy tales give a whole new meaning to the word “classic.”


2 October, 2018

PHARAOH’S TREASURE: THE ORIGIN OF PAPER AND THE RISE OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION, John Gaudet, Ph.D.

Just published from Pegasus Books!

“A lively overview of a medium that was central to public and private life in the ancient world.
An engaging journey to the distant past.”
– Kirkus Reviews

A thought-provoking history of papyrus paper―from its origins in Egypt to its spread throughout the world―revealing how it helped usher in a new era of human history.

For our entire history, humans have always searched for new ways to share information. This innate compulsion led to the origin of writing on the rock walls of caves and coffin lids or carving on tablets. But it was with the advent of papyrus paper when the ability to record and transmit information exploded, allowing for an exchanging of ideas from the banks of the Nile throughout the Mediterranean―and the civilized world―for the first time in human history.

In The Pharaoh’s Treasure, John Gaudet looks at this pivotal transition to papyrus paper, which would become the most commonly used information medium in the world for more than 4,000 years. Far from fragile, papyrus paper is an especially durable writing surface; papyrus books and documents in ancient and medieval times had a usable life of hundreds of years, and this durability has allowed items like the famous Nag Hammadi codices from the third and fourth century to survive.

The story of this material that was prized by both scholars and kings reveals how papyrus paper is more than a relic of our ancient past, but a key to understanding how ideas and information shaped humanity in the ancient and early modern world.

16 pages of color photographs; B&W illustrations throughout

About the Author
A Fulbright Scholar to both India and Malaya, John Gaudet is a writer and practicing ecologist. His early research on papyrus, funded in part by the National Geographic Society, took him to Uganda, Kenya, Sudan, and Ethiopia. A trained ecologist with a PhD from University of California at Berkeley, he is the author of Papyrus: The Plant that Changed the World, and his writing has appeared in Science, Nature, Ecology, the Washington Post, Salon and the Huffington Post. He lives in McLean, Virginia. Follow John on Twitter @BwanaPapyrus