Stuff in the ‘Gay Courter’ Category

14 September, 2020

Courter

Gay Courter’s latest book, Quarantine! How I Survived the Diamond Princess Coronavirus Crisis, will be published by Post Hill Press on November 10, 2020.  

In early February 2020, Gay and her documentary filmmaker husband, Phil, found themselves quarantined in Yokohama aboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship by the Japanese government, just as they were about to disembark after a two-week southeast Asian cruise. Quarantine! is the insider’s book on the Diamond Princess episode, a suspenseful real-life drama recounting Gay and Phil’s twelve-day ordeal aboard ship, their tenacious efforts to get the U.S. government to repatriate them and other Americans, and their additional fifteen-day quarantine under federal order at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas.

Gay and Phil own Courter Films & Associates, based in Crystal River, Florida. They have produced more than three hundred documentary, educational, and corporate films and won numerous awards,  two Emmys.

Before the COVID-19 pandemic curtailed travel, Gay and Phil had several international adventures each year. Gay’s travel articles for the Creators Syndicate go out to two thousand publications with about forty million readers.

Millions of copies of Gay Courter’s previous books have sold.  Her novels The MidwifeRiver of DreamsCode Ezra, and Flowers in the Blood made the New York Times bestseller list.

In the award-winning I Speak for This Child: True Stories of a Child Advocate, Gay recounts her twenty-five years as a volunteer appointed to help neglected and abused children in the Florida courts. The publication of that book led to many television appearances, including on TodayGood Morning America, and 20/20, and speaking engagements throughout the U.S.

This experience, as well as book tours for her novels, helped prepare her for the successful media campaign she and Phil launched, with the aid of their three adult children and Bobbie Carlton and her team at Carlton PR and Marketing, asking for the help of the U.S. government to evacuate them and other Americans from the Diamond Princess as the number of cases of the yet-unnamed novel coronavirus, now known as COVID-19, grew day by day.

In addition to the more than 150 interviews with media outlets from around the globe that Gay and Phil did while under quarantine in Japan and Texas, Gay wrote two op-eds for the Washington Post and an article for The Atlantic.

See quarantinediamondprincess.com for more about Quarantine! and for updates on Phil’s companion documentary, Quarantine! How We Survived the Diamond Princess Coronavirus Crisis.  See gaycourter.com for more about Gay and her previous books.

 


17 July, 2013

Sequel to Ashley Rhodes-Courter’s THREE LITTLE WORDS sold!

I first met Ashley Rhodes-Courter when she was 16.  I represented her adoptive mother, Gay Courter, a wonderful commercial novelist, and nonfiction writer.  Ashley had just won a contest sponsored by Scholastic for an essay on “What Harry Potter Means to Me.”  As a child, Ashley had been in and out of foster homes from age 2-12.  The encouragement she received from teachers, and a love of reading saved her from the often abuIMG_9703sive and sad circumstances in her foster homes.  Harry Potter gave her hope.  A year later, Ashley won another essay contest, this one sponsored by The New York Times magazine for teens.  She wrote movingly about being adopted—finally—by a loving family.  At that point, Ashley had been disappointed by so many families that she wasn’t quite sure what to expect. So when the judge asked her how she felt about her adoption, she uttered three little words:  “I guess so.”

That grew into a memoir about growing up in the foster system.  Published by Atheneum, a division of Simon & Schuster’s Children’s Publishing, Three Little Words went on to sell over 120,000 copies, hitting The New York Times bestseller list.  15115267Ashley, who since her teens, has been speaking out about the rights of children, especially in foster care and adoption situations, crisscrossed the country, addressing audiences as diverse as those who work in the justice system to schools and parent and teen groups.  The book was optioned for film, and as I write, director James Mangold (Girl Interrupted, Walk the Line) is collaborating with actress Reese Witherspoon in a feature film that should be released in the fall of 2014.

Ashley is now 27, married, with a biological son. Together with her husband, she has already fostered many children, trying to apply the lessons learned as a foster kid to parenting.  She has won scores of honors and awards for her inspiring work, graduated college with two majors and two minors, and finished a Master’s degree, all while juggling the life of a newlywed, learning to parent, and a whirlwind public speaking schedule.

I was thrilled when Ashley sent me a proposal for the sequel to Three Little Words, and even more thrilled when her publisher, Atheneum, picked up the publishing rights.  Three More Words continues Ashley’s story into early adulthood.  She will share stories of joy and heartbreak as she learns to live with the families she belongs to—the one she was born into and her adoptive family—and as she forges the bonds of a family of her own.  Most of all, she embraces the “three more words” that she now feels comfortable uttering:  “I love you.”  Three More Words continues the journey but also the biggest lesson of all, learning to give and receive love.

Thanks to a fantastic editor, Caitlyn Dlouhy, and the dream team at Atheneum.

–Joelle Delbourgo