Stuff in the ‘John Gaudet’ Category

2 October, 2018

PHARAOH’S TREASURE: THE ORIGIN OF PAPER AND THE RISE OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION, John Gaudet, Ph.D.

Just published from Pegasus Books!

“A lively overview of a medium that was central to public and private life in the ancient world.
An engaging journey to the distant past.”
– Kirkus Reviews

A thought-provoking history of papyrus paper―from its origins in Egypt to its spread throughout the world―revealing how it helped usher in a new era of human history.

For our entire history, humans have always searched for new ways to share information. This innate compulsion led to the origin of writing on the rock walls of caves and coffin lids or carving on tablets. But it was with the advent of papyrus paper when the ability to record and transmit information exploded, allowing for an exchanging of ideas from the banks of the Nile throughout the Mediterranean―and the civilized world―for the first time in human history.

In The Pharaoh’s Treasure, John Gaudet looks at this pivotal transition to papyrus paper, which would become the most commonly used information medium in the world for more than 4,000 years. Far from fragile, papyrus paper is an especially durable writing surface; papyrus books and documents in ancient and medieval times had a usable life of hundreds of years, and this durability has allowed items like the famous Nag Hammadi codices from the third and fourth century to survive.

The story of this material that was prized by both scholars and kings reveals how papyrus paper is more than a relic of our ancient past, but a key to understanding how ideas and information shaped humanity in the ancient and early modern world.

16 pages of color photographs; B&W illustrations throughout

About the Author
A Fulbright Scholar to both India and Malaya, John Gaudet is a writer and practicing ecologist. His early research on papyrus, funded in part by the National Geographic Society, took him to Uganda, Kenya, Sudan, and Ethiopia. A trained ecologist with a PhD from University of California at Berkeley, he is the author of Papyrus: The Plant that Changed the World, and his writing has appeared in Science, Nature, Ecology, the Washington Post, Salon and the Huffington Post. He lives in McLean, Virginia. Follow John on Twitter @BwanaPapyrus


19 October, 2017

THE PHAROAH’S TREASURE: The Origin of Paper and the Rise of Western Civilization by John Gaudet

Author of Papyrus: The Plant that Changed the World: From Ancient Egypt to Today’s Water Wars, John Gaudet, Ph.D’s THE PHARAOH’S TREASURE: The Origin of Paper and the Rise of Western Civilization, a multi-disciplinary history of how the first paper fueled the development of Western Civilization beginning in Egypt during the Neolithic period through the introduction of rag paper from China. (Pegasus/World Rights/Fall 2018)


13 May, 2014

Where I Write: John Gaudet

John GaudetOur next Where I Write, in which our authors share their favorite writing spots,  is from John Gaudet. 

“Nothing takes the place of a bare, dank, fifth floor, cold water garret in Paris in December (as exemplified by James Joyce ‘s digs in 1902.  He said he ate from one pot, never cleaned it, just added bits of food, re-cooked it and ate!)  My preferred spot is Greenberry’s Coffee & Tea Co., a McLean coffee shop in the Giant’s shopping center, frequented by about a half dozen other writers, a theatrical director and several artists.  The picture shows me talking to my Ba, the essence of my soul.  He’s telling me all about how the ancient Egyptians used papyrus.  So when I say “A little bird told me…” you know I’m not just shooting the breeze.” — John Gaudet

John’s book PapyrusThe Plant that Changed the World: From Ancient Egypt to Today’s Water Wars  will be published in June from Pegasus Books. Check out John on Twitter, Facebook, and his website .


4 March, 2014

Gaudet

papyrus umbelsA Fulbright Scholar to both India and Malaya, John Gaudet is a writer and practicing ecologist. His early research on the ancient aquatic plant, papyrus, funded in part by the National Geographic Society, took him to Uganda, Kenya, Sudan, Ethiopia, and many other places in Africa where papyrus grows. His work has been discussed in Nature, and by Peter Moore on the BBC show Science Now, and in an article by Alan Cowell in the New York Times.

Known as Bwana Papyrus, he came by his name honestly in Africa while working in the swamps along the Nile River. He is a trained ecologist with a Ph.D. from University of California at Berkeley and is the author of many scientific papers on the ecology and development of papyrus swamps.    His writing has appeared in the John Gaudet - head shotWashington Post, local magazines, and online.

His new book Pharaoh’s Treasure: The Origin of Paper and the Rise of Western looks at the pivotal transition to papyrus paper, which would become the most commonly used information medium in the world for more than 4,000 years. Far from fragile, papyrus paper is an especially durable writing surface; papyrus books and documents in ancient and medieval times had a usable life of hundreds of years, and this durability has allowed items like the famous Nag Hammadi codices from the third and fourth century to survive.

The story of this material that was prized by both scholars and kings reveals how papyrus paper is more than a relic of our ancient past, but a key to understanding how ideas and information shaped humanity in the ancient and early modern world.

Follow John Gaudet on Twitter where he goes by the handle @BwanaPapyrus.

 


16 July, 2013

THE PLANT THAT RULED THE WORLD,John Gaudet, Ph. D.

Part natural history and part ecological call-to-arms, the narrative interweaves the history of the ancient papyrus plant with the modern day story and a bunch more text to make sure I have the character maximum set just right ya know…