Stuff in the ‘Lisa Romeo’ Category

1 May, 2018

Starting with Goodbye, Lisa Romeo

“Lisa Romeo’s compelling memoir is both a loving tribute to her adored father and a clear-eyed portrait of their complicated relationship. Reading it, you can’t help but reflect on your own familial bonds—but you may also find, as I did, that Lisa’s lovely writing and startling insights lead you into deeper territory, as she wrestles with questions of identity, mortality, and the vagaries of love.”  —Christina Baker Kline, author of Orphan Train and A Piece of the World

Starting with Goodbye begins with loss and ends with love, as a midlife daughter rediscovers her enigmatic father after his death. Lisa has little time for grief, but when her dead dad drops in for “conversations,” his absent presence invites Lisa to examine why the parent she had turned away from in life now holds her spellbound.

Lisa reconsiders the affluent upbringing he financed (filled with horses, lavish vacations, bulging closets), and the emotional distance that grew when he retired to Las Vegas and she remained in New Jersey where she and her husband earn moderate incomes. She also confronts death rituals, navigates new family dynamics, while living both in memory and the unfolding moment.

In this brutally honest yet compelling portrayal and tribute, Lisa searches for meaning, reconciling the Italian-American father—self-made textile manufacturer who liked newspapers, smoking, Las Vegas craps tables, and solitude—with the complex man she discovers influenced everything, from career choice to spouse.

By forging a new father-daughter “relationship,” grief is transformed to hopeful life-affirming redemption. In poignant, often lyrical prose, this powerful, honest book proves that when we dare to love the parent who challenged us most, it’s never too late.


1 May, 2018

Romeo

Lisa Romeo’s first book is Starting with Goodbye: A Daughter’s Memoir of Love after Loss, (University of Nevada Press, May 1, 2018).

Her short work is listed in Best American Essays 2016, and regularly published in both popular and literary venues, including the New York Times, O The Oprah Magazine, Longreads, Brain Child, Inside Jersey, Brevity, Under the Sun, Hippocampus, Purple Clover, Motherwell, Palm Beach Illustrated, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Tishman Review, Sport Literate, and many other places. She’s contributed to more than a dozen anthologies, including Flash Nonfiction Funny (Woodhall Press), Feed Me (Random House), The Best Advice in Six Words (St. Martin’s), and Why We Ride (Seal Press).

Lisa works as a graduate writing instructor, manuscript editor, freelance journalist, and writing coach. She is thesis director for Bay Path University’s MFA program, teaches periodically at Montclair State University and with The Writers Circle, and serves as an editor with Compose Journal and Cleaver Magazine.

Lisa frequently presents at writers conferences and leads workshops in many locations. She’s been recognized with grants and scholarships from the American Society of Journalists and Authors and the Vermont Studio Center and several Pushcart Prize nominations.

A former equestrian journalist and public relations specialist, Lisa earned an MFA degree at Stonecoast (University of Southern Maine) and a BS in journalism from Newhouse (Syracuse University).

Raised in northern New Jersey, Lisa spent many years as a competitor on the hunter/jumper horse show circuit, and lived in California, Las Vegas, Florida, and New York before returning to New Jersey where she married her high school crush. She now lives in her hometown with her husband and college-age sons.

Connect with Lisa at her website, on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or blog.

 


22 May, 2017

Every Loss is a Love Story: The Father Daughter Reunion, Lisa Romeo

The story of the unlikely, continuing and eventually richly satisfying relationship between a midlife daughter and her father after his death.  Death rituals, new family dynamics, grief and memory allow her to get to know her father once she has lost him in a way that she never did in when he was alive. (University of Nevada Press/World Rights/June 2018)