Stuff in the ‘Pegasus Books’ Category

4 August, 2020

Wilson

Barrie Wilson

An award-winning educator, Barrie Wilson, PhD, is Professor Emeritus & Senior Scholar, Religious Studies, York University, Toronto. An historian, he specializes in Early Christianity.

Wilson’s new book – Searching for the Messiah (Pegasus) – has just been released to rave reviews from scholars in the U.S.A., Canada and Israel. This ground-breaking historical investigation probes the idea of messiah from the Bible to Batman, with many stops in-between. Searching for the Messiah asks the fundamental question: what is a messiah? How should we recognize one should one appear?

King David, Jesus, Paul, political saviors as well as pop culture superheroes — all these figures appear as Wilson traces the evolution of the messianic concept and its migration from the religious domain into the secular. The ending is surprising as Wilson reflects on the overall search for a rescuer.

Of special interest is Wilson’s analysis of a much-neglected 1st century BCE writing. Written in Aramaic/Hebrew by a pious Jew in Jerusalem, this important work survives in a few Syriac and Greek manuscripts. This ancient text clearly sets forth the Jewish expectation of the messiah, just a few decades before the birth of Jesus.

  • Publishers Weekly: “Historians and lay readers alike will appreciate Wilson’s ingenuity and deep scholarship.”
  • Rivka Nir (Open University, Ra’anana, Israel) writes, “Wilson recruits his wide-ranging knowledge of Christianity, its textual and historical sources, and admirable writing skills, to lead us to a surprising conclusion.”
  • Gary Greenberg (jurist and biblical scholar, New York City) observes, “Is there a modern Messiah who can rise above politics and turn things around? [Wilson’s] answer may surprise you.”
  • Carla Ionescu (Trent University, Peterborough, ON): “This work is full of insights, well written and serious readers will come away with a better understanding of who is – and who is not – a messiah. The ending is surprising…and shocking.”

Wilson’s two earlier books established his reputation as an international historian of note. The Lost Gospel (Pagasus, 2014), co-authored with award-winning film-maker and bestselling author, Simcha Jacobovici, sparked worldwide controversy. This book decodes a mysterious ancient manuscript. Written by an anonymous monk in Syriac, the surviving manuscript is 1600 years old and based on an original that is likely a century or two older. The book was accompanied by a 2-hour feature documentary on Discovery Science in which Wilson participated.

The Lost Gospel provides an English translation along with two prefatory letters – never before translated that tell us that the book contains “a hidden message.” Once decoded, that secret has to do with Jesus being married and having two children. The idea that Jesus was human, Jewish, and, yes, married, upset many reviewers who preferred dogma over historical analysis.

How Jesus Became Christian (St. Martin’s Press, 2008) was a national bestseller in his native Canada, awarded the Tanenbaum Prize in History and short-listed for the Cundill International Prize in History. In How Jesus Became Christian Barrie Wilson challenges the way most people think of Christianity. He analyzes writings from the 1st and 2nd centuries CE that demonstrate that what we know as Christianity today is not the religion practiced by the historical Jesus and, in fact, bears little resemblance to what he taught. Rather, Wilson contends, contemporary Christianity was the creation of Paul, a man who never met the Jesus who roamed the Galilee and Jerusalem.

Learn more about Barrie and his work on his website!

 


4 August, 2020

Searching for the Messiah, Barrie Wilson

An award-winning historian of religion examines the role a “messiah” plays in Western culture, from its pre-Christian roots to modern interpretations of a savior.

” [Wilson] works through a careful, close reading of Hebrew scripture to explore how the idea of a messiah – an anointed leader with fairly specific characteristics – came about through the anointing of Hebrew kings and priests. In one of the meatiest sections, he examines how messiahship became a global rather than a local concept before ending with a discussion of modern messiah figures: superheroes. Historians and lay readers alike will appreciate Wilson’s ingenuity and deep scholarship.” — Publishers Weekly

Over the centuries, people have longed for a messiah, whether a religious figure such as Jesus, a political leader, or even in popular culture. The messianic quest emerges most acutely during difficult times when people experience a sense of powerlessness and desperation. But the concept of a messiah—a savior—has its root in the writings of ancient Judaism and early Christianity, evolving from an anointed leader to universal savior. Wilson turns to a little understood pre-Christian text, “The Psalms of Solomon,” which set the stage for messianic expectation just prior to the birth of Jesus.

Known today only to a handful of scholars—in marked contrast to the “Song of Solomon”—these important pslams were composed not by a King, but by a devout 1st century BCE Jew who witnessed terrible atrocities under brutal Roman rule. This crucial work encourages us to ask: what is a messiah? Who is a messiah? How would we recognized one should he or she appear? And what is a messiah supposed to do?

In his own lifetime, Jesus directed his followers to search for “the messiah within” in his parables.  Later, Paul changed the concept of “the messiah,” to “the Christ,” when presenting his message to Gentiles instead of Jews. Jesus was no longer a Jewish messiah but a Hellenistic divine avatar.

In Searching for the Messiah, Wilson reveals how this collective search for messiahs throughout modern human history has been fundamentally flawed. Jesus himself rejected the idea of an external fixer, instead formulating his teachings to focus on the role of the individual, their choices, and their actions.

Searching for the Messiah is revelatory and illuminating work of scholarship that will challenge and inspire.

 


15 July, 2020

LET THEM EAT PANCAKES: One Man’s Personal Revolution in the City of Light, Craig Carlson

A second helping of tales on the joys and challenges of working, eating, and loving in France from the New York Times bestselling author of Pancakes in Paris.

Craig Carlson set out to do the impossible: open the first American diner in Paris. Despite never having owned his own business before—let alone a restaurant, the riskiest business of all—Craig chose to open his diner in a foreign country, with a foreign language that also happens to be the culinary capital of the world. While facing enormous obstacles, whether its finding cooks who can navigate the impossibly petite kitchen (and create delicious roast Turkey for their Thanksgiving Special to boot), finding “exotic” ingredients like bacon, breakfast sausage, and bagels, and dealing with  constant  strikes, demonstrations, and Kafkaesque French bureaucracy, Craig and his diner, Breakfast in America, went on to be a great success—especially with the French.

By turns hilarious and provocative, Craig takes us hunting for snails with his French mother-in-law and invites us to share the table when he treats his elegant non-agrarian neighbor to her first-ever cheeseburger. We encounter a customer at his diner who, as a self-proclaimed anarchist, tries to stiff his bill, saying it’s his right to “dine and dash.” We navigate Draconian labor laws where bad employees can’t be fired (even for theft) and battle antiquated French bureaucracy dating back to Napoleon.

When Craig finds love, he and his debonair French cheri find themselves battling the most unlikely of foes—the notorious Pigeon Man—for their sanity, never mind peace and romance, in their little corner of Paris. For all those who love stories of adventure, delicious food, and over-coming the odds, Let Them Eat Pancakes (Pegasus July 2020) will satisfy your appetite and leave you wanting even more.

Reviews:
“Like his first memoir, Pancakes in Paris this charming sequel explores Carlson’s unexpected success operating an American diner in the capital of France, with plenty of colorful anecdotes and personal detours.” New York Times Book Review, New & Notable:

“A pleasant, witty memoir from an American diner owner in France.”, Kirkus Reviews (starred)

“Eat. Love. Paris. Craig Carlson shares his passion for food and France in this charming, thought-provoking collection of essays. With heart and humor, he shows us the best of America and France, and how we can learn from one another. Whether delving into cultural differences or the challenges and rewards of running a business, Craig is the perfect guide. Let Them Eat Pancakes is a delicious, satisfying dish about following your dreams.”

— Janet Skeslien Charles, author of The Paris Library

All the wit and heart of Pancakes in Paris, but even wittier and heartier. Craig Carlson serves up yet another delightful, dizzying account of life in the City of Light. He truly understands the imperfect yet inescapable love of expat life. You root for him on every page. — Lisa Anselmo, author of My (Part-Time) Paris Life: How Running Away Brought Me Home

“This second helping of stories about the author’s life in Paris is as cheering as an all-day American breakfast.”  — Stephen Clarke, author of A Year in the Merde and 1000 Years of Annoying the French.

Funny, inspiring, and moving. , The Huffington Post (Praise for PANCAKES IN PARIS)

“If you are a foodie and Francophile, and if you like rags-to-riches stories, you should curl up on an armchair with a strong cup of coffee and a croissant and tuck into Crag Carlson’s memoir.  A quintessential American tale, big and brash and filled with charm.”
Powell’s Book Blog (Praise for PANCAKES IN PARIS)

“Hearty and delicious.”
— Jennifer Coburn, author of WE’LL ALWAYS HAVE PARIS (Praise for PANCAKES IN PARIS)

“Carlson tells his story with an openness and an ironic sense of humor.  A great success story and will inspire readers to never stop trying to achieve their goals.” — Roger S. Christiansen, Director, “Friends” and “Hannah Montana” (Praise for PANCAKES IN PARIS)

Craig Carlson’s  “Let Them Eat Pancakes” is a feast for your funny bone. It is clever, informative, and filled with outrageous characters that make up the intoxicating appeal of the cuisine and people of Paris. It’s also an authentic insight into the bureaucracy of living and working in France. — Nancy Lombardo, Whats The Buzz New York

About the Author

New York Times bestselling author Craig Carlson first came to France as an exchange student in 1985 and instantly fell in love with the country. He never could have imagined that some thirty-five years later he’d be the owner of two American diners in Paris and be nicknamed “Le Pancake Kid” by the French. With a background in journalism, Craig studied cinema at the prestigious USC School of Cinematic Arts, using his experience as a screenwriter to pen his debut memoir, Pancakes in Paris: Living the American Dream in France. Craig and his husband Julien currently split their time between Paris and Los Angeles. Well, at least they try to. With two busy diners that can’t be left alone for too long, their lives lean heavily on the Paris side, which, of course, is not such a bad thing, n’est-ce pas?

 


21 January, 2020

S.Kelly

Stephen Kelly is the author of a trio of mystery novels from Pegasus Books that are set in southern England during World War II: The Language of the Dead; The Wages of Desire; and Hushed in Death (Pegasus).

Stephen spent more than thirty years in the newspaper business as a reporter, editor and columnist. His work has appeared in The Baltimore Sun, The Washington Post, Baltimore Magazine and other publications. He has a Master’s degree from the Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars and has taught writing and journalism at Hopkins; Towson University, in Baltimore; and Sweet Briar College, in Virginia. 

He lives in Columbia, Maryland, with his wife, Cindy, and their daughters, Anna and Lauren. Find out more about Stephen and his books at his website: stephenkellybooks.com.


14 August, 2019

THE DOG WENT OVER THE MOUNTAIN, Peter Zheutlin

The New York Times bestselling author of Rescue Road and Rescued embarks on a cross-country journey to take the measure of America with a loyal friend.

“Poignant and magnificent. Brilliantly observed and Odyssean in breadth, this book reveals all that is generous about the American heart. A classic story of finding truth and humanity in the mundane―and how a man and his dog learned to live in the moment, on the trip of a lifetime.”
– Elissa Altman, author of Motherland

 On the cusp of turning 65, a man and his beloved rescue dog of similar vintage take a poignant, often bemusing, and keenly observed journey across America and discover a big-hearted, welcoming country filled with memorable characters, a new-found appreciation for the life they temporarily left behind, and a determination to live more fully in the moment as old age looms.

Inspired by John Steinbeck’s Travels with Charley, Zheutlin, hits the road for a 9,000-mile odyssey with Albie to experience all that American is and means today.  Similar in approach and tone to Bill Bryson’s best-selling travel classics, but with an endearing canine sidekick, The Dog Went Over the Mountain (Pegasus, September 2019) will delight dog lovers, baby boomers and anyone who seeks to experience life on the open road with a four-legged companion.

24 pages of color photographs

Praise for Peter Zheutlin and his new book:

Peter Zheutlin has written a lovely, moving, important book about a subject that is both heartbreaking and joyful. Greg Mahle, the central figure of this story, is now a hero of mine. Dogs are not just property. They are one way God tests our compassion.”
– Dean Koontz (Praise for RESCUE ROAD)

“A thought-provoking read very much in the spirit of Travels with Charley. Every generation rediscovers America anew; Peter and Albie capture the magic and essence Steinbeck discovered with Charley.”
– Michele Speich, Executive Director, National Steinbeck Center

“Entertaining and thoughtful. Packed with history, fascinating characters, and of course, fabulous dogs. A great book for anyone who loves dogs, road trips, or America. As someone who loves all three, I was captivated right from the beginning.””
– Teresa Rhyne, author of the #1 NYT bestseller The Dog Lived (And So Will I)

“Zheutlin and Albie got to share the kind of cross-country journey that most Americans only dream about in the autumn of their lives. This story should inspire countless to get out there and go while man and mutt both still have the energy and enthusiasm to explore.””
– Kim Kavin, award-winning author of The Dog Merchants

“Zheutlin takes readers on a road to enlightenment that delights in the ordinary and spins gold from the day-to-day observations of our divided nation in flux. It’s a tale as timely as it is timeless, with the bond between man and dog as its beating heart. Peter and Albie’s journey gives us hope that the America we dreamed of isn’t as far away or as nostalgic as we thought.”
– Rory Kress, journalist and author of The Doggie in the Window

About the Author


24 April, 2019

LET THEM EAT PANCAKES: How I Survived Living in Paris Without Losing My Head, Craig Carlson

Owner and founder of the first American diner in Paris and author of Pancakes in Paris offers a second helping of more tales centered around the joys and challenges of living, working, eating, and loving in the City of Light. (Pegasus, World English, Summer 2020).


11 December, 2018

ARCHIPELAGO OF HOPE: Wisdom and Resilience from the Edge of Climate Change, Gleb Raygorodetsky, Ph.D.

Now available in paperback!

  • Nautilus Grand Prize winner
  • Library Journal best nonfiction book of the year selection
  • Library Journal starred review
  • 100 Must-read books of 2018, Do Lectures – Medium.com

An enlightening global journey reveals the inextricable links between Indigenous cultures and their lands―and how it can form the foundation for climate change resilience around the world.

“Required reading for the times we live in. Insightful and interesting.”
Jeff Vandermeer, NYT bestselling author of the Souther Reach trilogy

One cannot turn on the news today without a report on an extreme weather event or the latest update on Antarctica. But while our politicians argue, the truth is that climate change is already here. Nobody knows this better than Indigenous peoples who, having developed an intimate relationship with ecosystems over generations, have observed these changes for decades. For them, climate change is not an abstract concept or policy issue, but the reality of daily life.

After two decades of working with indigenous communities, Gleb Raygorodetsky shows how these communities are actually islands of biological and cultural diversity in the ever-rising sea of development and urbanization.  They are an “archipelago of hope” as we enter the Anthropocene, for here lies humankind’s best chance to remember our roots and how to take care of the Earth. These communities are implementing creative solutions to meet these modern challenges. Solutions that are relevant to the rest of us.

We meet the Skolt Sami of Finland, the Nenets and Altai of Russia, the Sapara of Ecuador, the Karen of Myanmar, and the Tla-o-qui-aht of Canada. Intimate portraits of these men and women, youth and elders, emerge against the backdrop of their traditional practices on land and water. Though there are brutal realties?pollution, corruption, forced assimilation―Raygorodetsky’s prose resonates with the positive, the adaptive, the spiritual―and hope.

24 pages of color photographs


29 October, 2018

HUSHED IN DEATH (An Inspector Lamb Mystery), Stephen Kelly

In the third volume of the Inspector Lamb mystery series, a murder at a hospital for veterans in rural England leaves Lamb with a village full of suspects, each with a motive and secrets of their own.  (Pegasus Books, November 2019)

“This will appeal to fans of Rennie Airth and Charles Todd.”
Publishers Weekly

In the spring of 1942, with the war in Europe raging, a gruesome murder shocks the rural community of Marbury, where a once-grand estate called Elton House has been transformed into a hospital for “shell-shocked” officers sent back from the front lines. When Detective Chief Inspector Lamb arrives to solve the case, he quickly learns that the victim, Elton House’s gardener Joseph Lee, had plenty of enemies in Marbury—and so he and his team have plenty of suspects.
Along with his team of investigators, which includes his daughter Vera, Lamb begins to untangle the threads of rivalry and deceit that lie beneath the surface of the seemingly-peaceful countryside village. It soon becomes clear that Lee’s mysterious past is intertwined with the history of Elton House itself, which fell into disrepair a generation earlier after a shockingly similar murder, and the mystery deepens further when Lamb discovers that one of the prime suspects has seemingly committed suicide.

As Lamb pieces together the connections between the crimes of the present and those of the past, he must dive into the darkest, most secret corners of Elton House to discover who is committing murder, and why.

About Stephen Kelly:

I’ve always loved reading good mystery novels, especially those from the English masters — Conan Doyle, Dame Agatha, Colin Dexter, Peter Robinson and others. I’m also a huge fan of the Norwegian crime novelist, Karin Fossum. Before turning to writing fiction with a vengeance, though, I was, for nearly thirty years, a newspaper reporter, editor and columnist. My work has appeared in the Baltimore Sun, The Washington Post, Baltimore Magazine, The Columbia Flier and Howard County Times. I have a Master’s from the Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars and have taught writing and journalism at Hopkins, Towson University, in Baltimore, and Sweet Briar College, in Virginia. I live in Columbia, Maryland, with my wife, Cindy, and our daughters, Anna and Lauren.

2 October, 2018

PHARAOH’S TREASURE: THE ORIGIN OF PAPER AND THE RISE OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION, John Gaudet, Ph.D.

Just published from Pegasus Books!

“A lively overview of a medium that was central to public and private life in the ancient world.
An engaging journey to the distant past.”
– Kirkus Reviews

A thought-provoking history of papyrus paper―from its origins in Egypt to its spread throughout the world―revealing how it helped usher in a new era of human history.

For our entire history, humans have always searched for new ways to share information. This innate compulsion led to the origin of writing on the rock walls of caves and coffin lids or carving on tablets. But it was with the advent of papyrus paper when the ability to record and transmit information exploded, allowing for an exchanging of ideas from the banks of the Nile throughout the Mediterranean―and the civilized world―for the first time in human history.

In The Pharaoh’s Treasure, John Gaudet looks at this pivotal transition to papyrus paper, which would become the most commonly used information medium in the world for more than 4,000 years. Far from fragile, papyrus paper is an especially durable writing surface; papyrus books and documents in ancient and medieval times had a usable life of hundreds of years, and this durability has allowed items like the famous Nag Hammadi codices from the third and fourth century to survive.

The story of this material that was prized by both scholars and kings reveals how papyrus paper is more than a relic of our ancient past, but a key to understanding how ideas and information shaped humanity in the ancient and early modern world.

16 pages of color photographs; B&W illustrations throughout

About the Author
A Fulbright Scholar to both India and Malaya, John Gaudet is a writer and practicing ecologist. His early research on papyrus, funded in part by the National Geographic Society, took him to Uganda, Kenya, Sudan, and Ethiopia. A trained ecologist with a PhD from University of California at Berkeley, he is the author of Papyrus: The Plant that Changed the World, and his writing has appeared in Science, Nature, Ecology, the Washington Post, Salon and the Huffington Post. He lives in McLean, Virginia. Follow John on Twitter @BwanaPapyrus


13 November, 2017

Archipelago of Hope by Gleb Raygorodetsky


As this fine book shows, indigenous communities and lands have been among the places hardest hit by climate change–so it should come as no surprise that around the world indigenous people have been in the absolute forefront of a fight for a liveable planet. I take real comfort from the fact that the oldest wisdom traditions on the planet and the newest are on the same page, that scientists and shamans are telling much the same story. Now it’s time for the rest of us to pay some attention Bill McKibben, author of DEEP ECONOMY

An enlightening global journey reveals the inextricable links between Indigenous cultures and their lands―and how it can form the foundation for climate change resilience around the world.

One cannot turn on the news today without a report on an extreme weather event or the latest update on Antarctica. But while our politicians argue, the truth is that climate change is already here. Nobody knows this better than Indigenous peoples who, having developed an intimate relationship with ecosystems over generations, have observed these changes for decades. For them, climate change is not an abstract concept or policy issue, but the reality of daily life.

After two decades of working with indigenous communities, Gleb Raygorodetsky shows how these communities are actually islands of biological and cultural diversity in the ever-rising sea of development and urbanization.  They are an “archipelago of hope” as we enter the Anthropocene, for here lies humankind’s best chance to remember our roots and how to take care of the Earth. These communities are implementing creative solutions to meet these modern challenges. Solutions that are relevant to the rest of us.

We meet the Skolt Sami of Finland, the Nenets and Altai of Russia, the Sapara of Ecuador, the Karen of Myanmar, and the Tla-o-qui-aht of Canada. Intimate portraits of these men and women, youth and elders, emerge against the backdrop of their traditional practices on land and water. Though there are brutal realties?pollution, corruption, forced assimilation―Raygorodetsky’s prose resonates with the positive, the adaptive, the spiritual―and hope.

24 pages of color photographs