Stuff in the ‘Pegasus Books’ Category

11 December, 2018

ARCHIPELAGO OF HOPE: Wisdom and Resilience from the Edge of Climate Change, Gleb Raygorodetsky, Ph.D.

Now available in paperback!

  • Nautilus Grand Prize winner
  • Library Journal best nonfiction book of the year selection
  • Library Journal starred review
  • 100 Must-read books of 2018, Do Lectures – Medium.com

An enlightening global journey reveals the inextricable links between Indigenous cultures and their lands―and how it can form the foundation for climate change resilience around the world.

“Required reading for the times we live in. Insightful and interesting.”
Jeff Vandermeer, NYT bestselling author of the Souther Reach trilogy

One cannot turn on the news today without a report on an extreme weather event or the latest update on Antarctica. But while our politicians argue, the truth is that climate change is already here. Nobody knows this better than Indigenous peoples who, having developed an intimate relationship with ecosystems over generations, have observed these changes for decades. For them, climate change is not an abstract concept or policy issue, but the reality of daily life.

After two decades of working with indigenous communities, Gleb Raygorodetsky shows how these communities are actually islands of biological and cultural diversity in the ever-rising sea of development and urbanization.  They are an “archipelago of hope” as we enter the Anthropocene, for here lies humankind’s best chance to remember our roots and how to take care of the Earth. These communities are implementing creative solutions to meet these modern challenges. Solutions that are relevant to the rest of us.

We meet the Skolt Sami of Finland, the Nenets and Altai of Russia, the Sapara of Ecuador, the Karen of Myanmar, and the Tla-o-qui-aht of Canada. Intimate portraits of these men and women, youth and elders, emerge against the backdrop of their traditional practices on land and water. Though there are brutal realties?pollution, corruption, forced assimilation―Raygorodetsky’s prose resonates with the positive, the adaptive, the spiritual―and hope.

24 pages of color photographs


29 October, 2018

HUSHED IN DEATH (An Inspector Lamb Mystery), Stephen Kelly

In the third volume of the Inspector Lamb mystery series, a murder at a hospital for veterans in rural England leaves Lamb with a village full of suspects, each with a motive and secrets of their own.  (Pegasus Books, November 2019)

“This will appeal to fans of Rennie Airth and Charles Todd.”
Publishers Weekly

In the spring of 1942, with the war in Europe raging, a gruesome murder shocks the rural community of Marbury, where a once-grand estate called Elton House has been transformed into a hospital for “shell-shocked” officers sent back from the front lines. When Detective Chief Inspector Lamb arrives to solve the case, he quickly learns that the victim, Elton House’s gardener Joseph Lee, had plenty of enemies in Marbury—and so he and his team have plenty of suspects.
Along with his team of investigators, which includes his daughter Vera, Lamb begins to untangle the threads of rivalry and deceit that lie beneath the surface of the seemingly-peaceful countryside village. It soon becomes clear that Lee’s mysterious past is intertwined with the history of Elton House itself, which fell into disrepair a generation earlier after a shockingly similar murder, and the mystery deepens further when Lamb discovers that one of the prime suspects has seemingly committed suicide.

As Lamb pieces together the connections between the crimes of the present and those of the past, he must dive into the darkest, most secret corners of Elton House to discover who is committing murder, and why.

About Stephen Kelly:

I’ve always loved reading good mystery novels, especially those from the English masters — Conan Doyle, Dame Agatha, Colin Dexter, Peter Robinson and others. I’m also a huge fan of the Norwegian crime novelist, Karin Fossum. Before turning to writing fiction with a vengeance, though, I was, for nearly thirty years, a newspaper reporter, editor and columnist. My work has appeared in the Baltimore Sun, The Washington Post, Baltimore Magazine, The Columbia Flier and Howard County Times. I have a Master’s from the Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars and have taught writing and journalism at Hopkins, Towson University, in Baltimore, and Sweet Briar College, in Virginia. I live in Columbia, Maryland, with my wife, Cindy, and our daughters, Anna and Lauren.

2 October, 2018

PHARAOH’S TREASURE: THE ORIGIN OF PAPER AND THE RISE OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION, John Gaudet, Ph.D.

Just published from Pegasus Books!

“A lively overview of a medium that was central to public and private life in the ancient world.
An engaging journey to the distant past.”
– Kirkus Reviews

A thought-provoking history of papyrus paper―from its origins in Egypt to its spread throughout the world―revealing how it helped usher in a new era of human history.

For our entire history, humans have always searched for new ways to share information. This innate compulsion led to the origin of writing on the rock walls of caves and coffin lids or carving on tablets. But it was with the advent of papyrus paper when the ability to record and transmit information exploded, allowing for an exchanging of ideas from the banks of the Nile throughout the Mediterranean―and the civilized world―for the first time in human history.

In The Pharaoh’s Treasure, John Gaudet looks at this pivotal transition to papyrus paper, which would become the most commonly used information medium in the world for more than 4,000 years. Far from fragile, papyrus paper is an especially durable writing surface; papyrus books and documents in ancient and medieval times had a usable life of hundreds of years, and this durability has allowed items like the famous Nag Hammadi codices from the third and fourth century to survive.

The story of this material that was prized by both scholars and kings reveals how papyrus paper is more than a relic of our ancient past, but a key to understanding how ideas and information shaped humanity in the ancient and early modern world.

16 pages of color photographs; B&W illustrations throughout

About the Author
A Fulbright Scholar to both India and Malaya, John Gaudet is a writer and practicing ecologist. His early research on papyrus, funded in part by the National Geographic Society, took him to Uganda, Kenya, Sudan, and Ethiopia. A trained ecologist with a PhD from University of California at Berkeley, he is the author of Papyrus: The Plant that Changed the World, and his writing has appeared in Science, Nature, Ecology, the Washington Post, Salon and the Huffington Post. He lives in McLean, Virginia. Follow John on Twitter @BwanaPapyrus


13 November, 2017

Archipelago of Hope by Gleb Raygorodetsky


As this fine book shows, indigenous communities and lands have been among the places hardest hit by climate change–so it should come as no surprise that around the world indigenous people have been in the absolute forefront of a fight for a liveable planet. I take real comfort from the fact that the oldest wisdom traditions on the planet and the newest are on the same page, that scientists and shamans are telling much the same story. Now it’s time for the rest of us to pay some attention Bill McKibben, author of DEEP ECONOMY

An enlightening global journey reveals the inextricable links between Indigenous cultures and their lands―and how it can form the foundation for climate change resilience around the world.

One cannot turn on the news today without a report on an extreme weather event or the latest update on Antarctica. But while our politicians argue, the truth is that climate change is already here. Nobody knows this better than Indigenous peoples who, having developed an intimate relationship with ecosystems over generations, have observed these changes for decades. For them, climate change is not an abstract concept or policy issue, but the reality of daily life.

After two decades of working with indigenous communities, Gleb Raygorodetsky shows how these communities are actually islands of biological and cultural diversity in the ever-rising sea of development and urbanization.  They are an “archipelago of hope” as we enter the Anthropocene, for here lies humankind’s best chance to remember our roots and how to take care of the Earth. These communities are implementing creative solutions to meet these modern challenges. Solutions that are relevant to the rest of us.

We meet the Skolt Sami of Finland, the Nenets and Altai of Russia, the Sapara of Ecuador, the Karen of Myanmar, and the Tla-o-qui-aht of Canada. Intimate portraits of these men and women, youth and elders, emerge against the backdrop of their traditional practices on land and water. Though there are brutal realties?pollution, corruption, forced assimilation―Raygorodetsky’s prose resonates with the positive, the adaptive, the spiritual―and hope.

24 pages of color photographs


22 June, 2017

Silber

Alexandra Silber is an actress, Grammy-nominated singer, and writer.
She recently starred as Guenevere in the Shakespeare Theatre Company production of Camelot, and as Tzeitel in the Broadway revival of Fiddler on the Roof. She earlier played Hodel in a revival of the same show in London’s West End. It was those two roles which inspired her to write After Anatevka.
Other Broadway and West End credits include Master Class, Arlington (Outer Critics Circle nomination), Hello Again (Drama League nomination), and She Loves Me, Kiss Me, Kate, The Woman in White, and Carousel. She has appeared on all three incarnations of Law & Order and has performed in a variety of outlets ranging from the 57th Grammy Awards to Carnegie Hall. Alexandra is also a 2014 Grammy nominee for her portrayal of Maria in the first-ever full symphonic recording of West Side Story, with the San Francisco Symphony.She lives in New York, and After Anatevka , a novel inspired by Fiddler on the Roof  was her first book (2017), with a paperback edition publishing in July 2018.  Her memoir White Hot Grief Parade releases in July 2018.  Both books are published by Pegasus Books.

9 December, 2015

Raygorodetsky

Raygordetsky - Head shotFor over two decades, Gleb has lived and worked with Indigenous communities around the world on traditional governance, sacred sites, climate change adaptation, and Biocultural Diversity conservation.

Born and raised in a small village on the Bering Sea coast of Kamchatka Peninsula, USSR, Gleb moved to the USA in 1988. He made his way from New York City to Fairbanks, Alaska, where he continued the wildlife biology studies he began back in the Soviet Union. Since then, he has traversed the Americas, from Canada’s Beaufort Sea to the Brazilian Amazon, from the Andes to the shores of Lake Superior, living and working with Indigenous peoples as diverse as Aleut fur seal hunters, Amazonian Caboclos pirarucu fishermen, and the Gwich’in caribou hunters. After earning his Ph.D. in Ecology, Evolution & Environmental Biology from Columbia University, he has continued working with Indigenous groups around the world, from Papua New Guinea and Australia, to Peru and Finland.

EcuadorSami peopleGleb in AltaiGleb has written and contributed to books, scientific and popular articles on Indigenous issues, traditional knowledge, and conservation. He wrote Gwich’in Words about the Land – a book on the Indigenous ecological knowledge of Gwich’in people in the Northwest Territories in Canada that was published locally for all Gwich’in families. His popular articles on Indigenous and environmental issues appeared in various magazines, including Cultural SurvivalAlternatives , and National Geographic. Since 2011, he has been a contributing author for National Geographic NewsWatch and United Nations University’s OurWorld 2.0.

Gleb is a co-founder of Conversations with the Earth (CWE) – an indigenous-led multimedia initiative that amplifies indigenous voices in the global discourse on climate change. Over a million visitors saw CWE exhibits at National Museum of Denmark in Copenhagen, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington DC, and United Nations Headquarters in New York.

Gleb is now working on the ARCHIPELAGO OF HOPE: ENCOUNTERS AT THE EDGE OF OUR CHANGING PLANET – a book about climate change and Indigenous peoples, to be published by Pegasus Books  in 2017. His latest assignment for National Geographic Magazine is taking him to the Yamal Peninsula in northern Russia, to report on how, in the face of climate change, the Nenets reindeer herders co-exist with one of the largest gas and oil development projects in the circumpolar north. This story is scheduled for publication in 2017.

You can find out more about Gleb and his work on his website www.gleb-raygorodetsky.com and follow him on Twitter @ArchipelagoHope.  His Instagram Account is not to be missed and can be found here: archipelagohope.

 


8 April, 2015

Simcha Jacobovici speaks

The controversy over the “discovery” of the bones of Jesus and his family has stirred passions.  Simcha Jacobovici, noted documentarian and co-author of THE LOST GOSPEL, speaks out.  51KT+T4c2YL._SY300_

Here’s a link to the NBC clip: http://www.nbcnews.com/science/science-news/geologist-revives-controversy-over-jesus-tomb-n336251