Stuff in the ‘Relationships’ Category

18 February, 2020

The 10 Keys to a Successful Remarriage: How to Make Everything Work Better the Second Time Round, Terry Gaspard

Based on the author’s personal experience, over 30 years of clinical practice, knowledge from leading marriage and remarriage researchers, and 100 in-depth interviews of remarried people, The Remarriage Manual offers 10 essential keys to a successful remarriage:

1. Build a Culture of Appreciation, Respect, and Tolerance. Negativity is toxic. Personal growth and love are possible when you can express appreciation through positive words and actions.
2. Make Your Remarriage a Top Priority. Never underestimate the power of intentional time with your partner to increase physical and emotional intimacy.
3. Ditch the Baggage from Your First Marriage. Learn ways to be more reflective and less reactive to triggers that hit raw spots or vulnerabilities stemming from prior relationships.
4. Don’t Keep Secrets about Money. Remarried couples face complicated financial issues such as unequal assets, child support, alimony, and education costs for children and stepchildren. Honesty and full disclosure about finances are essential.
5. Don’t Let Mistrust Stop You from Being Vulnerable and Emotionally Intimate. Learn that vulnerability and trust go hand in hand and the steps you can take to be authentic and intimate with your partner so you can achieve long-lasting love.
6. Get Sexy and Fall in Love All Over Again. Given the stressors of a second marriage, it can be particularly challenging to stay sexually intimate. Yet moments of connection, such as touching, talking, or making love, are all part of the glue that holds a second marriage together.
7. Don’t Make a Big Deal about Nothing . . . but Do Deal with Important Issues. Differences in beliefs, expectations, and conversational styles can cause you to blow things out of proportion and tune each other out. Effective communication will help you overcome these types of misunderstandings.
8. Manage the Flames of Conflict. You can’t avoid disagreements entirely. What you can do, however, is learn how to manage them successfully to avoid the “blame game” so that they can nourish rather than drain your remarriage.
9. Embrace Your Role as a Stepparent and Create Positive Stepfamily Memories. There is no such thing as instant love in a stepfamily. When biological parents are involved, the relationships can get even trickier. Learn to adjust to your role as a stepparent―the chances of a second marriage succeeding go way up when both partners adopt an attitude of “we’re in this together.”
10. Say You’re Sorry and Mean It. Studies show that apologizing to your partner for hurting their feelings and granting forgiveness are crucial to the success of a second marriage. It’s essential that remarried couples learn the value of sincere apologies and forgiveness.

Drawing on the experiences of dozens of couples and remarriage scenarios, Terry Gaspard shows you how to bring each key home and set up your relationship for lasting success.

Whether you are thinking of remarrying and concerned about going the distance or are already remarried and struggling, The Remarriage Manual provides the expert advice, practical tools, hope, and inspiration you need to prevent challenges from becoming deal breakers. The 10 keys provided here will help put you and your spouse on solid footing; keep the flame between you burning bright; and build a deeply trusting, loving, and sustainable connection for the long haul.


18 September, 2018

THE REMARRIAGE MANUAL: The 10 Keys that Make Sex, Money, Kids, Communication and More Work the Second Time Round, Terry Gaspard, LICSW

From the author of DAUGHTERS OF DIVORCE, marriage counselor, and relationship blogger Terry Gaspard explains how go avoid becoming another dismal divorce statistic by learning tools for handling the issues specific to a second (or third) marriage (Sounds True, World Rights, Spring 2020)


7 August, 2017

Grant

Ann Grant didn’t aspire to be a divorce lawyer. She was a partner at a large multi-national law firm, representing fortune five hundred companies, married to a corporate litigator. They had three children and life was good. Until it all came to a crashing halt. Over the next five years, Ann went through a devastating divorce that threatened her emotional health and financial stability.

Divorce is a multi-billion-dollar industry — but the system is rigged. Divorce “professionals” (lawyers, mediators, forensic accountants and therapists) bill by the hour. They financially benefit when women are indecisive and uninformed. Divorces often needlessly drag on for years, while the “professionals” line their pockets with divorcing women’s misery.

Ann had an epiphany. As she was driving down the freeway, headed to trial with the evidence she needed to “win,” she realized a fundamental truth. No one “wins” in a divorce. There are only losers. The only way to take back her sanity was to stop the madness. And she did just that.

Through the process of letting go and finding forgiveness, Ann took back her life. She found her way through the chaos by developing a personal mindfulness practice, and combined with her legal know-how, was able to create a new and better life for her and her children.

When it was finally over, she made the decision to commit her career to helping women navigate the legal minefields and outsmart the system so they can get to a new and better life with their sanity intact and their money where it belongs: in the bank. In her legal practice in Manhattan Beach, California, she helps dozens of women every year. And now, in her forthcoming book, The Divorce Hacker’s Guide to Untying the Knot (New World Library), she reveals the secrets she has learned and that the industry does not want women to know, because they provide a swift route out.

Together with financial advisors and therapists, Ann also runs workshops for women facing divorce and blogs frequently on the topic. It is the women in these workshops, and their stories, that are the inspiration for the work Ann is now doing through DivorceHacker.

Ann received her Juris Doctorate degree from the University of San Diego School of Law where she graduated cum laude, 1991. While there, she served as Editor of the San Diego Law Review. She is the former editor of The Woman Advocate Newsletter, the official publication of the Woman Advocate Committee of the Litigation Section of the American Bar Association and an adjunct professor of law at Southwestern University in Los Angeles.

Check out Ann and her blog at
www.thedivorcehacker.com
Twitter @DivorceHacker
Instagram
https://www.instagram.com/divorcehacker
Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/thedivorcehacker/

 


20 June, 2017

The Divorce Hacker’s Guide to Untying the Knot, by Ann E. Grant

We’re thrilled to announce that Georgia Hughes, Editorial Director of New World Library has nabbed rights to The Ann E. grantDivorce Hacker’s Guide to Untying the Knot by Ann E. Grant. Divorce is a multi-billion-dollar industry — but the system is rigged.  Divorce “professionals” (lawyers, mediators, forensic accountants and therapists) bill by the hour.  They financially benefit when women are indecisive and uninformed.  Divorces often needlessly drag on for years, while the “professionals” line their pockets with divorcing women’s misery.  The Divorce Hacker’s Guide to Untying the Knot puts a stop to all that with a step-by-step guide to ending a marriage quickly and efficiently while giving women back their power.

As a litigator and a survivor of a high-conflict divorce, Ann Grant know both sides of this story — and what she knows is that divorce does not have to be drawn out, expensive or complicated.  She experienced first-hand how devastating divorce can be both emotionally and financially and she learned how not just to survive, but thrive. When it was finally over, she made the decision to commit her career to helping women navigate the legal minefields and outsmart the system so they can get to a new and better life with their sanity intact and their money where it belongs: in the bank. In her legal practice in Manhattan Beach, California, she help dozens of women every year.  And now, in DivorceHacker, she reveals the secrets she has learned and that the industry does not want women to know, because they provide a swift route out.

“If you can make a human in nine months, you can untie the knot in less time, and I will show you how to do that.” — Ann E. Grant  

Check out Ann on the web at www.thedivorcehacker,com.

 

 

 


10 November, 2016

LOVE AND…Assholes, The One & Other Fun Ways to Sabotage Your Relationship, Jen Kim

From the popular thirty-something Psychology Today blogger–Valley Girl with a Brain–comes a self-help book that doesn’t want you to change. Kim draws on personal experience as well as the latest scientific findings to shed light on why we do the things we do when it comes to relationships. (Skyhorse Publishing, World Rights, 2018)


25 January, 2016

Daughters of Divorce by Terry Gaspard and Tracy Clifford

daughters of divorcesmall web use Terry  Tracey IMG_9460

Restore your faith in love and build healthy, successful relationships with this essential guide for every woman haunted by her parents’ divorce.

Over 40 percent of Americans ages eighteen to forty are children of divorce. Yet women with divorced parents are more than twice as likely than men to get divorced themselves and struggle in romantic relationships. In this powerful, uplifting guide, mother-daughter team Terry and Tracy draws on thirty years of clinical practice and interviews with over 320 daughters of divorce to help you recognize and overcome the unique emotional issues that parental separation creates so you can build the happy, long-lasting relationships you deserve.

 

Reviews

“If you’re in a family of divorce as a daughter or parent this book is for you. Gaspard and Clifford are a mother and daughter who have gone through it themselves. From self-esteem to the impact on your relationships, this book gives you practical doable action steps to help you learn how to change your story or narrative and see divorce through adult eyes. It can be very helpful for adult children of divorce, and for mothers and fathers who are looking for insights and ideas to help their daughters.” – Jeff Zimmerman, ABPP Clinical Psychologist and co-author of Adult Children of Divorce and The Co-Parenting Survival Guide

Daughters of Divorce is an original and timely treatment of a very important topic. Bravely told from the perspective of the authors, a divorced mother and her daughter, Daughters of Divorce provides empathy, guidance and wisdom for those who are struggling to understand the impact of divorce on their lives and choices. Highly recommended!” – Joshua Coleman, Ph.D. Psychologist and author of When Parents Hurt: Compassionate Strategies When You and Your Grown Child Don’t Get Along

“Finally! A book about divorce that is specifically focused on women. This thoughtful, insightful and uplifting book acknowledges the unique impact of divorce on its daughters while offering concrete steps and practical solutions.” – Elisabeth J. LaMotte LICSW, author of Overcoming Your Parents’ Divorce

“Rarely have I read a book that is as honest, courageous and optimistic as Terry Gaspard’s Daughters of Divorce. Ms. Gaspard has skillfully crafted a book that combines authenticity, warmth and clinical expertise – a rare combination in the self-help genre. This gem of a book is chock filled with intriguing personal reflection, vignettes, tasks and assignments. It is a virtual handbook for daughters seeking to stop this transgenerational pattern, dead in its tracks.” – Ross Rosenberg, M.Ed., LCPC, CADC, CSAT, author of The Human Magnet Syndrome: Why We Love People Who Hurt Us

“”…the authors’ solid and empathetic advice is applicable to anyone who has suffered childhood traumas affecting his or her ability to trust in the power of love.”
” – Publishers Weekly


5 December, 2015

Gaspard

Popular relationship blogger, family therapist, and author, Terry Gaspard, MSW, LICSW, has seen first hand that 2nd marriages face challenges that 1st marriages simply do not. Increased financial pressures; unfinished business with exes; the complications of blending families; scrambling for time for romance, let alone sex; and more can strain second marriages to the breaking point. In her latest book, THE REMARRIAGE MANUAL: How to Make Everything Work Better the Second Time Around (Sounds True, February 2020), she shares the expert advice, practical tools, hope, and inspiration that remarrying (and already remarried) couples need to make sure their 2nd (or 3rd) marriages will finally be their happily ever after.

THE REMARRIAGE MANUAL will help put readers and their spouses on solid footing; make sure the flame between them keeps burning bright; and build a deeply trusting, loving, and sustainable connection for the long haul.

Terry Gaspard, MSW, LICSW, is a licensed therapist with over thirty years of clinical experience specializing in children, individuals, couples, families, divorce, and remarriage, as well as an author, nonfiction writer, and college instructor.  She is a popular speaker who frequently offers commentary on divorce, marriage, remarriage, and relationship issues. Two of Terry’s research studies on adult children of divorce have been published in the Journal of Divorce and Remarriage. Her previous book, Daughters of Divorce: Overcome the Legacy of Your Parents Breakup and Enjoy a Happy, Long-lasting relationship, was published by Sourcebooks in 2016. She is the owner of movingpastdivorce.com and a regular contributor to The Gottman Relationship Blog, Patheos.com, marriage.com, thegoodmenproject.com,  divorcedmoms.com, and divorcemagazine.com.

Follow Terry on Twitter at @MovingPastDivorce and find updates about their book on their Facebook page: Moving Past Divorce

 

 


23 July, 2014

DAUGHTERS OF DIVORCE, Terry Gaspard and Tracy Clifford

Licensed clinical social worker, teacher, and relationship blogger, Terry Gaspard, and her daughter Tracy Clifford’s DAUGHTERS OF DIVORCE, a guide for the millions of women who are haunted by their experiences growing up in divorced households and are struggling to heal the wounds of the past and build lasting, happy relationships as adults. (Sourcebooks, Fall 2015), World excluding Asia